Harvesting Worm Castings From a Flow-Through Worm Bin





Harvesting Worm Castings From a Flow-Through Worm Bin


how many worms should i order if I want to start a very small worm farm? I want to put it in my apartment, so it cant be big. plus my garden isnt large anyway lol thanks! love all your videos. I was reccommended to get advice from you from someone that works at a garden store. said all your tips are wonderful
You are a great!
I follow your channel and I learn much from your experience.
Thank you for sharing!
Greetings from North West Italy.
Dario
have you experienced any issues with rodents? rats? anything that tries to come after the worms?
I see I'm a little late to the party but... do you think it would have been better to put the harvesting rods in the bottom of the top bin and support it with something else in the bottom bin? I would think that way you could just take the top bin off and dump the castings directly from the bottom bin.
Love the design and have converted 2 bins to this system! I do have one question, will this system work for African and/or European Nightcrawlers? As these tend to go deeper down, I'm not positive how well it will work
Beautiful chorus effect in the beginning
Split some poly tubing and slip it over the top edge of your harvesting hole to protect your arm.

I have read that 20 - 24" in depth is the de facto standard for flow through depth to keep worms out of the harvested material.
Brilliant! We just discovered anaerobic reactions in our bin and way too much moisture. Definitely a very helpful video.
I always enjoy your videos, Patrick. I think I have watched all of the vermicomposting videos. I am wondering if you prefer the two-bin flow-through to the single-bin flow through. Also, I would love to hear your perspective on the disadvantages of either system. Thanks. Sue
You could get all the worm leachate by having a sloping plastic bag tied to a glass bottle. All the leachate would collect into the bottle, and then when you are ready to harvest the castings, just untie the plastic bag, remove the bottle, and let the casting drop down.
Hi, I've just re-watched your flow-through worm bin videos. Last winter I made two flow-through bins following your design and I'm generally very happy with them. I do have some questions, if that's all right. First, if I spread the bedding and food all over the surface of the bin the worms like to congregate on the lips of the lower bin, thereby not staying where the food and the bedding is, is that a problem? I'm wondering why do they prefer it there, and if they hang out there are they actually doing any work so to speak? If I push everything away from the lip and make a mound they stay in the bedding and food area. Secondly, I have never had any leachate in the bottom bin, does that mean the bins are too dry? They were a bit dry, I noticed, so I add more water to the food now and the worms seem happy, but as everybody is always talking about leachate, I wondered if it's a problem that there is none. Thanks for your time and advice.
How many worm bins does it take to fill up a 6 gallon bucket and how long did you wait for harvests? Awesome stuff!
Greetings Patrick. Going to take the dive into worm farming. I have watched so many videos on this and I think I am going to go with your design. Thanks so much for all your informative videos. Blessings, Jim
Thanks allot 1YR, love the vids very cool, my garden is improving allot, you rock.
Very interesting worm bin design. Thanks for sharing.
how long does it take for worms to make castings if i used food waste only? is it dependant on weather as well? and can i use earth worms or do red wrigglers do a better job? my compost bin is full of earth worms, think for a handful of compost i can count 20 worms at least (think its the rock dust). at the moment i mix my food waste with grass and dried out weeds but i can see that food is taking longer to break down
Thanks, well done.  I appreciate especially the professional video work and narration which makes the content so much more watchable.
Thank you for this, it is brilliant.  I think I may reproduce your work.  I love my worms, hate harvesting, I spend way too much time with tiny worms and egg casings. You could set two small litter boxes or aluminum baking trays in the bottom that would make it even easier to pull out the castings, as they would fit out your hole in the front. Because I don't like separating out the compost, I set two bins in my raised garden beds, one out of a five gallon bucket and one with 4" PVC, both fenestrated with many1/4" holes, it is amazing how much better the plants adjacent are doing than the rest of the bed.
   I have two questions for you. Is that pumice in your castings? I occasionally have trouble with worms crawling out my drainage holes in the bottom once my bottom bedding has degraded, I think it may be due to excess moisture and some clogged holes, I am unsure. Does this happen with yours? Thank you for your time.
Early on in your video, it looked like you were using the Worm Inn flow through composting system.  How did you like that setup?  Why did you switch over to a Rubbermaid conversion?
Patrick, Just a quick question: I have the same sized bins as yours only I think I may be overcrowding. Presently, I have roughly 3,000 worms (3 lbs) in 2 bins. How many pounds of worms do you recommend per bin? Thanks in advance! ( P.S. I copied your conversion, and it looks great, reduced moisture build up a lot!)


27227 | 368 | 6m 36s



Agro Space


Agricultural economics refers to economics as it relates to the "production, distribution and consumption of [agricultural] goods and services".

The word agriculture is a late Middle English adaptation of Latin agricultūra, from ager, "field", and cultūra, "cultivation" or "growing".